stopping with eyes wide opentoMake™ Press & Editions

THE VERY LOCAL HARVEST

The weekly delivery from our CSA … this is the harvest from which we are preparing, cooking, and eating this week (and the other bike-full).

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YA) Really Organic: locally grown, organic farming practice, in-season. Missoula Grain & Vegetable

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THE SPECTER OF INVERTED TOTALITARIANISM


Sheldon Wolin, our most important contemporary political theorist, died Oct. 21 at the age of 93. In his books “Democracy Incorporated: Managed Democracy and the Specter of Inverted Totalitarianism” and “Politics and Vision,” a massive survey of Western political thought that his former student Cornel West calls “magisterial,” Wolin lays bare the realities of our bankrupt democracy, the causes behind the decline of American empire and the rise of a new and terrifying configuration of corporate power he calls “inverted totalitarianism.”

Wendy Brown, a political science professor at UC Berkeley and another former student of Wolin’s, said in an email to me:
“Resisting the monopolies on left theory by Marxism and on democratic theory by liberalism, Wolin developed a distinctive — even distinctively American — analysis of the political present and of radical democratic possibilities. He was especially prescient in theorizing the heavy statism forging what we now call neoliberalism [… a policy model of social studies and economics that transfers control of economic factors to the private sector from the public sector. It takes from the basic principles of neoclassical economics, suggesting that governments must limit subsidies, make reforms to tax laws in order to expand the tax base, reduce deficit spending, limit protectionism and open markets up to trade. It also seeks to abolish fixed exchange rates, back deregulation, permit private property and privatize businesses run by the state … Neoliberalism supports fiscal austerity, deregulation, free trade, privatization and greatly reduced government spending.], and in revealing the novel fusions of economic with political power that he took to be poisoning democracy at its root.”

Wolin throughout his scholarship charted the devolution of American democracy and in his last book, “Democracy Incorporated,” details our peculiar form of corporate totalitarianism. “One cannot point to any national institution[s] that can accurately be described as democratic,” he writes in that book, “surely not in the highly managed, money-saturated elections, the lobby-infested Congress, the imperial presidency, the class-biased judicial and penal system, or, least of all, the media.”

Inverted totalitarianism is different from classical forms of totalitarianism. It does not find its expression in a demagogue or charismatic leader but in the faceless anonymity of the corporate state. Our inverted totalitarianism pays outward fealty to the facade of electoral politics, the Constitution, civil liberties, freedom of the press, the independence of the judiciary, and the iconography, traditions and language of American patriotism, but it has effectively seized all of the mechanisms of power to render the citizen impotent.

Wolin saw the militarists and the corporatists, who formed an unholy coalition to orchestrate the rise of a global American empire after the war, as the forces that extinguished American democracy. He called inverted totalitarianism
“the true face of Superpower.”

Chris Hedges | Sheldon Wolin and Inverted Totalitarianism

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This is Mine, That is Yours

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FOR ALL THAT SHALL BE — YES

“For all that has been — thanks. For all that shall be — yes.”
"In our age, the road to holiness necessarily passes through the world of action."

Dag Hammarskjöld | Markings (1964)

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Competing Narratives : Morning Pieces

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A BRIEF OPPORTUNITY

Seizing the opportunity to interact and experience the Other; the ‘living, ever-surprising world around us’ … a sweet 8 mile run today along the muddy river, food of a different sort.

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YA) The River
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Finishing the Blue Mountain 30K

“You can think of death bitterly or with resignation ... and take every possible measure to postpone it, … Or, more realistically, you can think of life as an interruption of an eternity of personal nonexistence, and seize it as a brief opportunity to observe and interact with the living, ever-surprising world around us.”

Barbara Ehrenreich | Natural Causes: An Epidemic of Wellness, the Certainty of Dying, and Killing Ourselves to Live Longer

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AND LEARN BY GOING WHERE WE HAVE TO GO

The Waking

I wake to sleep, and take my waking slow.   
I feel my fate in what I cannot fear.   
I learn by going where I have to go.

We think by feeling. What is there to know?   
I hear my being dance from ear to ear.   
I wake to sleep, and take my waking slow.

Of those so close beside me, which are you?   
God bless the Ground!   I shall walk softly there,   
And learn by going where I have to go.

Light takes the Tree; but who can tell us how?   
The lowly worm climbs up a winding stair;   
I wake to sleep, and take my waking slow.

Great Nature has another thing to do   
To you and me; so take the lively air,   
And, lovely, learn by going where to go.

This shaking keeps me steady. I should know.   
What falls away is always. And is near.   
I wake to sleep, and take my waking slow.   
I learn by going where I have to go.

Theodore Roethke, from The Collected Poems of Theodore Roethke. ©1953

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The Global Harmony Labyrinth

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THE OPTIONS

In other news worth noting . . . writing in the journal Science, Guy Midgley of Stellenbosch University in South Africa warned that the options for humanity are becoming severely restricted. . .”Habitat loss may soon mean half the world’s insects, and many plants and animals as well, could find themselves without their familiar home ranges.

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We’re going the wrong way.
Human race is just 0.01% of all life but has destroyed over 80% of wild mammals

“Humans depend on plants, insects and other animals to deliver water quality, soil conservation, flood prevention, crop pollination and natural pest control. All this is now threatened, not just by the clearing of forests and the growth of the cities, but by the profligate use of fossil fuels which release greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, to drive global warming. Researchers know, through a detailed study of the geological past, what higher concentrations of carbon dioxide can do to global climate . . . There is way too much debate about the issue of climate change and whether or not it is real. What we really need to be doing is debating how we solve this problem . . . Those very high CO2 concentrations could well change the ecosystems of the world irrevocably. If we increase CO2 to over a thousand parts per million, over the next fifty to sixty years, which we are quite capable of doing if we fail to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels, we could literally move the world back 20 to 30 million years in the space of a century. It is like moving ecosystems backwards in time at the speed of light.”

Professor Guy Midgley | Climate News Network

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CO-PAY & THE MORAL CENTER

“Jesus set up free healthcare clinics everywhere he went. He healed everybody and never charged a leper a co-pay.”

“He (Rev William Barber) reserves particular contempt for politicians who rely on racial dog whistles, voter suppression and gerrymandering.” The Guardian.

Meena the Cat says; “Listen to Rev Barber and the Rev Judith.”
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Meena the Number One Guard Cat at Her Post

“There is no religious left and religious right . . . There is only a moral center. And the scripture is very clear about where you have to be to be in the moral center — you have to be on the side of the poor, the working, the sick, the immigrant.”

Rev William Barber

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IN THE END

“It is good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end.”

Ursula K. Le Guin | The Left Hand of Darkness
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WHERE ARE YOU GOING ?

I cannot begin to address the near complete dysfunction of the airline industry. Spending the night with the cleaners on the hard floor at Gate B95 in Denver.

Cat: Where are you going?
Alice: Which way should I go?
Cat: That depends on where you are going.
Alice: I don’t know.
Cat: Then it doesn’t matter which way you go.”

Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland


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Moving up in the world of air travel // stopping

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SLOW TIME

Visiting Brother Bruce and my Dad. Yesterday, Mothers Day, visiting/stopping/remembering/flowers at Lakewood where Sister Ann (mother to Adrian and Nathan) and my Mother’s ashes are placed.

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Dad and Me, Father at 96, Son at 68


IMG_8767Lakewood Cemetery

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Bruce, Bob and Me

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LIGHT SURROUNDS IN MYSTERY

Speechless beneath . . . .

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Entering
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Inside
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Site Specific work Sky Pesher 2005 by James Turrell at the Walker Art Center.

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SPELLING IS NOT MY STRENGTH

I was always the first to sit down during spelling contests. Unnecessarily humiliating. With ADD and dyslexia I had/have a difficult time and once again. . . . I’ll have to redo the photopolymer plate and start over. But why, of the many people I asked to do a look/see and check did nobody say anything ‽ Back up and start again.

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HIGH WATER

Warm weather and rain and above average snow pack = lots of water rushing down the river corridor. 25,000 cfs of muddy brown water with debris, mud and the burnt logs from last summers fires. The Clark Fork reached flood stage this week racing past between the dikes below our place. What a marvelous thing; water alive, water in motion, water free and water wet.


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